I wrote the method Piano Town with Keith Snell. We wanted to provide you with the tools to make your job easier than it's ever been before.

Here's what one teacher says about Piano Town:

"Starting from the first page, Piano Town is a unique experience for each child. Each child can commemorate their first piano lesson by filling out this charming page.

I have been using "Piano Town" ever since it was first introduced into the market and my students and I just love it.

 

The songs sound great and are very motivating for students to work hard at. Students love looking and the illustrations and trying to figure out what is going on with the piano town characters. They love being able to name their town at the very first lesson."     — Marianne

 

The layout features that are the basis for my Attention Grabbers Books inform the visual design of Piano Town. These books are unusually vivid, clear and easy-to-use even for first-time users.

 

Delightful illustrations and a subtle, continuing story line draw children in to the world of Piano Town.

Starting from the first page, Piano Town is a unique experience for each child. Each child can commemorate their first piano lesson by filling out this charming page.

Delightful illustrations and a subtle, continuing story line draw children in to the world of Piano Town.

Introducing Sharp is an active process in Piano Town. Notice that every sharp requires the student to move to the black key. Once they've played this piece, they remember exactly what to do when they see a sharp!

© 2019 by Diane Hidy

You'll wonder how you ever taught without this 32-page book. I made these cards for my students to give them plenty of opportunities to practice all the different skills they were acquiring. This series starts with the simplest possible rhythmic patterns on the Landmark notes Middle C, Bass F and Treble G. Each set becomes incrementally more difficult.

Here are a few of the many different ways to use these cards:

  • Encourage students to write in their own fingering. This paves the way for making true fingering choices later on

  • Circle the thirds before starting to read the flashcards. This helps the student focus on the difference between steps and skips.

  • Help your student write in their own staccatos and slurs. Try them out. Talk to them about why they do or don't like them. 

  • Help the student add dynamics and phrase marks.

  • Print these in their entirety and use them as a book.

  • Print them on heavy paper or card stock and cut them into separate cards. Trying sending home a set with a student and ask them to become proficient with each one. At the next lesson, mix them up and play them in random order. It’s a nice combination of preparation and reading.